Tag Archives: coding

Computer Science Education Week 2017

Hi all, it’s CS Education Week! Am forming a blog post of the emails I send out to my school to encourage participation in the Hour of Code. Will update this post (or maybe a new one) as I email more.

 

Thu 11/30 (before CS Ed Week):

Greetings Patterson Family!

Next week is Computer Science Education Week, and we have celebrated this each of the last several years at Patterson by having students do an Hour of Code! Please check out https://hourofcode.com/us and consider picking one day next week to teach coding in each of your classes.

 

hourofcode.com
The Hour of Code is a global movement reaching tens of millions of students in 180+ countries. Anyone, anywhere can organize an Hour of Code event.

 

There are a variety of activities, including ones that can be done on computer workstations, ones that can be done on students’ call phones / mobile devices, and ones that are “unplugged” using cups or printable manipulatives etc. Depending on your classroom dynamic, you could also work together as a whole class to complete coding exercises on your teacher computer / projector screen. Or, if you’re feeling ambitious, you could try to come up with your own lesson that relates coding to your content area, and teaches problem-solving or algorithmic thinking (e.g. peanut butter and jelly making as clear communication, necessary for ELA/writing classes and also for writing computer code that breaks a process down into multiple steps and communicates them clearly to the computer to run).

 

FYI – for our ESOL population, many (though not all) of the computer-based coding activities have instructions in multiple languages that can be adjusted at the bottom of the screen.

Please let me know if you plan to do an activity, or if you want to chat about different possibilities. For computer access, I can offer my room for second period (all days next week) or fifth period (except Monday). There may also be laptop carts available on a first-come first-serve basis that you can follow the usual process to reserve. Additionally, I am interested in tracking which activities are used, as well as student names for certificates.
Happy coding!
Nick Yates
Mon 12/4 AM: The Hour of Code is here!

Greetings Patterson Family!

CS Education Week is here, and with it the Hour of Code!

Please consider teaching a coding lesson in one of your classes this week, so that we can help our students become creators of technology rather than merely consumers of technology.

Here are some intro videos to the HoC: https://hourofcode.com/us/promote/resources#videos (YouTube + download link in case YT is blocked)

Among the activities, there seem to be two new ones for this year that I’ve noticed near the top: Minecraft (three versions, one from each of the past two years, plus a new tutorial for this year) and Google Design-Your-Own-Logo-with-Scratch.

You can also sort the activities by the technology you plan to use (computers, student mobile devices, or unplugged – no devices), AND nicely by content area (e.g. if you teach Science and want to teach a cross-curricular science+coding lesson):

code_options

 

Please let me know if I can help in any way, whether by consulting with you on which lesson might best fit your class, or having you bring your class down to my room, etc.

HAPPY CODING!

Best,

Nick Yates and the Academy of Engineering and Technology Team

Mon 12/4 PM: Google Doodle today celebrates 50 years of kids coding!

Hey Patterson people,

The Logo programming language, designed for kids with a turtle that moved around and could draw pictures, was invented 50 years ago! Today’s Google Doodle celebrated that fact. In case you missed it, and want to try it out, here’s a link that will still work after today is over: https://www.google.com/doodles/celebrating-50-years-of-kids-coding . It is a cool symbol-based (no words, so should work for students of any language!) HoC-style activity within a Google Doodle, with a rabbit trying to eat some carrots. Check it out!

 

Celebrating 50 years of Kids Coding #GoogleDoodle
Also, if you’re interested, there is an actual Hour of Code activity based on that original turtle (updated to the Python language), which can be found at https://hourofcode.com/codehsturtle
Happy CS Education Week!

NY

Tue 12/5: Hour of Code subject recommendations

If you haven’t started the Hour of Code yet because you don’t have access to a classroom set of computers and aren’t sure what coding has to do with your curriculum, here are my recommendations for unplugged subject-specific activities!

  • Science – Rock Paper Scissors, with connections to biological population modeling (unplugged activity plus presentation on teacher screen)
  • Social Studies – History of Codes and Ciphers (one lesson, plenty more material as well e.g. wikipedia)
  • Art – Algorithmic Doodles (fractals & algorithms)
  • Math – Hexahexaflexagons (geometry, discrete math w/ directed graphs and finite state machines)
  • English / Language Arts – Magical Book Magic (computational thinking and patterns with words)

If any English teachers do have access to a set of computers, the Automatic Homework Excuse Generator looks pretty cool too!

Happy coding,

Nick Yates & the AOET Team

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Planning In Code

One of the skills I work with students on in many of my classes is how to plan to code, in a helpful and efficient way. This is true certainly in my computer science classes but also in my Principles of Engineering (POE) and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) classes as well. Pseudocode, flow charts, process flow diagrams, are all structures and formats I have used before with students, with varying degrees of success.

This year, with Advanced Placement Computer Science A (AP CSA), I definitely plan to use several of the UML diagram formats with Java coding. Certainly class diagrams (like this one I posted last week) fit very well with an object-oriented language like Java. The course I took this summer on the Software Development Process, and especially our group project there, helped me understand several of the UML formats in a deeper way; I can definitely see myself using the Use Case and perhaps Sequence diagrams as well.

Anyway, today I worked with my AP CSA students to develop a few less-formal diagrams on the board: We did some mind mapping together as we brainstormed attributes or variables with values that would apply to weather (for a weather app):

weatherAttributes.jpg

And then we did the beginning of a decision tree:

weatherConditionals.PNG

My engineering students are using a planning table on paper to plan out their G&M-codes they will use to control the CNC milling machine to carve out their initials.

And my AP CS Principles students haven’t gotten deep enough into code yet to use a planning template. We have done some coding using Python as a calculator and to draw pictures (turtle library), and to play interactively against the “intelligent paper”. But most of our time so far has been discussing computing innovations, their impact on society, and working on a research presentation.

After school today, I had students stay for CyberPatriot practice, and it was also the first day of Interactive Mural Lab, led by some folks from MICA, which will help coach some students to creative a computer-programmed, electronics-infused, creative mural on a wall of our school! I’m super-excited to watch their progress over the course of this year, both to see how the mural turns out, and to see what skills and techniques students will learn as a part of this project.

Phew – I’m exhausted just writing about all that! 🙂  Have a good evening.

#day15 #180blog #teach180

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